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All Images and content on this site are 2018 David J. Cogswell Photography. All rights reserved. All images and content may not be copied or used in any form without written permission from Cogswellphoto.com

 

 

The I'iwi is one of the most attractive birds in the Hawaiian Honeycreeper family. It can be easily identified by it's scarlet body, black and white wing feathers and curved, salmon-colored bill. I'iwi are small birds that are about the size of a house sparrow. Adult males and females are similar in appearance and like all Hawaiian honeycreepers, I'iwi are usually found at altitudes above 4,000 feet. I'iwi feed on nectar from Ohia Lehua blossoms and from other nectar bearing forest flowers. They also include insects in their diet.

A very difficult photography subject, I'iwi rarely pause for more than a few seconds. The one in this photo had been preening and singing while resting on a dead ohia branch in the late afternoon sun. As I focused on the bird, three other I'iwi (one of them singing) flew directly overhead. The I'iwi looked up toward them as I fired the shutter. Soon after this shot was taken, the light quickly faded and the day's sunset was obscured by a thick layer of fog that blanketed the slopes of Mauna Loa. The forest canopy that only a short time ago had been filled with energetic choruses of many different species of native Hawaiian birds had now calmed to an eerie and silent stillness.

 

 

NATIVE HAWAIIAN BIRDS >